Chemtrails Toxic Levels of Antimony

How can antimony affect my health?
Exposure to antimony at high levels can result in a
variety of adverse health effects.
Breathing high levels for a long time can irritate your
eyes and lungs and can cause heart and lung problems,
stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach ulcers.
In short-term studies, animals that breathed very high
levels of antimony died. Animals that breathed high levels

 

How might I be exposed to antimony?
o Because antimony is found naturally in the environment,
the general population is exposed to low levels of it
every day, primarily in food, drinking water, and air.
o It may be found in air near industries that process or
release it, such as smelters, coal-fired plants, and refuse
incinerators.
o In polluted areas containing high levels of antimony, it
may be found in the air, water, and soil.
o Workers in industries that process it or use antimony ore
may be exposed to higher levels.

 

 

 

 

The World is Now Demanding Answers and Accountability…

As an introduction to this article, we will first cover information to familiarize the uninformed readers as to the core facts and information so that a more complete understanding is possible, given this complex issue.

recent report by CBS Atlanta detailed how some local citizens are outraged that such “crimes against humanity” are being carried out right before our eyes in secret.

In the report Sen. Johnny Isakson was interviewed on the subject of chemtrails saying quote:

“That is a theory that some people have, but there is no evidence this is happening. This is not happening.”

It looks as if members of the government’s upper echelon and even members of the Senate will go to extreme lengths to suppress this vital information from reaching the American people.

Not to mention they signed off on the multi-billion dollar per year budgets in an economic crisis, with little to no transparency to the public.

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In regards to aerosol spraying into the earth’s atmosphere, a recent update to data assembled by The Carnicom Institute reveals the chemicals used and their respective levels of concentration. The toxic levels that are being used in these aerosols goes beyond shocking – it would appear that these levels are indeed criminal by EPA Standards.

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Chemtrails and Antimony Compounds

Exposure to antimony occurs in the workplace or from skin contact with soil at hazardous waste sites. Breathing high levels of antimony for a long time can irritate the eyes and lungs, and can cause problems with the lungs, heart, and stomach. This chemical has been found in at least 403 of 1,416 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Antimony is a silvery-white metal that is found in the earth’s crust. Antimony ores are mined and then mixed with other metals to form antimony alloys or combined with oxygen to form antimony oxide.

Little antimony is currently mined in the United States. It is brought into this country from other countries for processing. However, there are companies in the United States that produce antimony as a by-product of smelting lead and other metals.

What is antimony?
Antimony is a silvery-white metal that is found in the earth’s crust. Antimony ores are mined and then mixed with other metals to form antimony alloys or combined with oxygen to form antimony oxide.

Little antimony is currently mined in the United States. It is brought into this country from other countries for processing. However, there are companies in the United States that produce antimony as a by-product of smelting lead and other metals.

Antimony isn’t used alone because it breaks easily, but when mixed into alloys, it is used in lead storage batteries, solder, sheet and pipe metal, bearings, castings, and pewter. Antimony oxide is added to textiles and plastics to prevent them from catching fire. It is also used in paints, ceramics, and fireworks, and as enamels for plastics, metal, and glass.

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What happens to antimony when it enters the environment?
Antimony is released to the environment from natural sources and from industry.
In the air, antimony is attached to very small particles that may stay in the air for many days.
Most antimony ends up in soil, where it attaches strongly to particles that contain iron, manganese, or aluminum.
Antimony is found at low levels in some rivers, lakes, and streams.
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How might I be exposed to antimony?
Because antimony is found naturally in the environment, the general population is exposed to low levels of it every day, primarily in food, drinking water, and air.
It may be found in air near industries that process or release it, such as smelters, coal-fired plants, and refuse incinerators.
In polluted areas containing high levels of antimony, it may be found in the air, water, and soil.
Workers in industries that process it or use antimony ore may be exposed to higher levels.
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How can antimony affect my health?
Exposure to antimony at high levels can result in a variety of adverse health effects.

Breathing high levels for a long time can irritate your eyes and lungs and can cause heart and lung problems, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach ulcers.

In short-term studies, animals that breathed very high levels of antimony died. Animals that breathed high levels had lung, heart, liver, and kidney damage. In long-term studies, animals that breathed very low levels of antimony had eye irritation, hair loss, lung damage, and heart problems. Problems with fertility were also noted. In animal studies, problems with fertility have been seen when rats breathed very high levels of antimony for a few months.

Ingesting large doses of antimony can cause vomiting. We don’t know what other effects may be caused by ingesting it. Long-term animal studies have reported liver damage and blood changes when animals ingested antimony. Antimony can irritate the skin if it is left on it.

Antimony can have beneficial effects when used for medical reasons. It has been used as a medicine to treat people infected with parasites.

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How likely is antimony to cause cancer?
The Department of Health and Human Services, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have not classified antimony as to its human carcinogenicity.

Lung cancer has been observed in some studies of rats that breathed high levels of antimony. No human studies are available. We don’t know whether antimony will cause cancer in people.

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Is there a medical test to show whether I’ve been exposed to antimony?
Tests are available to measure antimony levels in the body. Antimony can be measured in the urine, feces, and blood for several days after exposure. However, these tests cannot tell you how much antimony you have been exposed to or whether you will experience any health effects. Some tests are not usually performed in most doctors’ offices and may require special equipment to conduct them.

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Has the federal government made recommendations to protect human health?
The EPA allows 0.006 parts of antimony per million parts of drinking water (0.006 ppm). The EPA requires that discharges or spills into the environment of 5,000 pounds or more of antimony be reported.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set an occupational exposure limit of 0.5 milligrams of antimony per cubic meter of air (0.5 mg/m³) for an 8-hour workday, 40-hour workweek.

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) currently recommend the same guidelines for the workplace as OSHA.

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Glossary
Carcinogenicity: Ability to cause cancer.

CAS: Chemical Abstracts Service.

Ingestion: Taking food or drink into your body.

Long-term: Lasting one year or more.

Milligram (mg): One thousandth of a gram.

Parasite: An organism living in or on another organism.

ppm: Parts per million.

Short-term: Lasting 14 days or less.

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References
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1992. Toxicological Profile for antimony. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service.

Antimony isn’t used alone because it breaks easily, but when mixed into alloys, it is used in lead storage batteries, solder, sheet and pipe metal, bearings, castings, and pewter. Antimony oxide is added to textiles and plastics to prevent them from catching fire. It is also used in paints, ceramics, and fireworks, and as enamels for plastics, metal, and glass.

Everyone is exposed to low levels of antimony in the environment. Acute (short-term) exposure to antimony by inhalation in humans results in effects on the skin and eyes. Respiratory effects, such as inflammation of the lungs, chronic bronchitis, and chronic emphysema, are the primary effects noted from chronic (long-term) exposure to antimony in humans via inhalation. Human studies are inconclusive regarding antimony exposure and cancer, while animal studies have reported lung tumors in rats exposed to antimony trioxide via inhalation. EPA has not classified antimony for carcinogenicity.
Uses
Antimony is alloyed with other metals such as lead to increase its hardness and strength; its primary use is in antimonial lead, which is used in grid metal for lead acid storage batteries. (1)
Other uses of antimony alloys are for solder, sheet and pipe, bearing metals, castings, and type metal. (1)
Antimony oxides (primarily antimony trioxide) are used as fire retardants for plastics, textiles, rubber, adhesives, pigments, and paper. (1)
Sources and Potential Exposure
Antimony is found at very low levels throughout the environment. (1)
The concentration of antimony in ambient air ranges from less than 1 nanogram per cubic meter (ng/m3) (0.000001 milligram per cubic meter [mg/m3]) to about 170 ng/m3 (0.000170 mg/m3). However, near factories that convert antimony ores into metal, or make antimony oxide, concentrations may be greater than 1,000 ng/m3 (0.01 mg/m3). (1)
Soil usually contains very low concentrations of antimony (less than 1 part per million [ppm]). However, higher concentrations have been detected at hazardous waste sites and at antimony-processing sites. (1)
Food contains small amounts of antimony: the average concentration of antimony in meats, vegetables, and seafood is 0.2 to 1.1 parts per billion (ppb). (1)
People who work in industries that process antimony ore and metal, or make antimony oxide, may be exposed to antimony by breathing dust or by skin contact. (1)
Assessing Personal Exposure
Antimony can be measured in the urine, feces, and blood. (1)
Health Hazard Information
Acute Effects:
The only effects reported from acute exposure to antimony by inhalation in humans are effects on the skin and eyes. Skin effects consist of a condition known as antimony spots, which is a rash consisting of pustules around sweat and sebaceous glands, while effects on the eye include ocular conjunctivitis. Oral exposure to antimony in humans has resulted in gastrointestinal effects. (1,2)
Animal studies have reported effects on the lungs, cardiovascular system, and liver from acute exposure to high levels of antimony by inhalation. (1)
Antimony is considered to have high acute toxicity based on short-term oral tests in rats, mice, and guinea pigs. (3)
Chronic Effects (Noncancer):
The primary effects from chronic exposure to antimony in humans are respiratory effects that include antimony pneumoconiosis (inflammation of the lungs due to irritation caused by the inhalation of dust), alterations in pulmonary function, chronic bronchitis, chronic emphysema, inactive tuberculosis, pleural adhesions, and irritation. (1,2)
Other effects noted in humans chronically exposed to antimony by inhalation are cardiovascular effects (increased blood pressure, altered EKG readings and heart muscle damage) and gastrointestinal disorders. (1,2)
Animal studies have reported effects on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems and kidney from chronic inhalation exposure. Oral animal studies have reported effects on the blood, liver, central nervous system (CNS), and gastrointestinal effects. (1)
A National Toxicology Program (NTP) 14-day drinking water study of potassium antimony tartrate reported an increase in relative liver and kidney weights in the high dose group (females only). A 13-week intraperitoneal injection study, also by the NTP, reported inflammation and/or fibrosis of the liver in mice dosed with potassium antimony tartrate. (6)
EPA has not established a Reference Concentration (RfC) for antimony. However, EPA has established an RfC of 0.0002 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) for antimony trioxide based on respiratory effects in rats. The RfC is an estimate (with uncertainty spanning perhaps an order of magnitude) of a continuous inhalation exposure to the human population (including sensitive subgroups) that is likely to be without appreciable risk of deleterious noncancer effects during a lifetime. It is not a direct estimator of risk but rather a reference point to gauge the potential effects. At exposures increasingly greater than the RfC, the potential for adverse health effects increases. Lifetime exposure above the RfC does not imply that an adverse health effect would necessarily occur. (4)
EPA has medium confidence in the study on which the RfC was based because it uses an adequate number of animals but it is not a chronic, lifetime study; medium confidence in the database because no adequate developmental or reproductive studies are available; and, consequently, low confidence in the RfC. (4)
The Reference Dose (RfD) for antimony is 0.0004 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day (mg/kg/d) based on longevity, blood glucose, and cholesterol in rats. (5)
EPA has low confidence in the study on which the RfD was based because only one species was used, only one dose level was used, no no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) was determined, and gross pathology and histopathology were not well described; low confidence in the database due to lack of adequate oral exposure investigations; and, consequently, low confidence in the RfD. (5)
Reproductive/Developmental Effects:
An increased incidence of spontaneous abortions, as compared with a control group, was reported in women working at an antimony plant. Disturbances in the menstrual cycle were reported in women exposed to various antimony compounds in a metallurgical plant. However, the study that reported these findings was unclear about concurrent exposure to other chemicals, nor did it provide the characteristics of the controls used. (1,2)
Animal studies have reported a decrease in the number of offspring born to rats exposed to antimony prior to conception and throughout gestation. Reproductive effects, including metaplasia in the uterus and disturbances in the ovum-maturing process, were reported in a rat study, following inhalation exposure. (1)
Cancer Risk:
In one human study, inhalation exposure to antimony did not affect the incidence of cancer in workers employed for 9 to 31 years. (1)
Lung tumors have been observed in rats exposed to antimony trioxide by inhalation. (1,2,4)
EPA has not classified antimony for carcinogenicity.
Physical Properties
Antimony is a silvery-white metal that is found in the earth’s crust. Antimony ores are mined and then either changed to antimony metal or combined with oxygen to form antimony oxide. (1)
Antimony trioxide is a white powder that is very slightly soluble in water. (1)
Antimony metal is a very brittle, moderately hard metal. (1)
The chemical symbol for antimony is Sb, and it has an atomic weight of 121.75 g/mol. (1)
The chemical formula for antimony trioxide is O3Sb2, and its molecular weight is 291.50 g/mol. (1)